The aging of the baby boomer generation has created a revolution in the world of retirement. The current generation of retirees is living longer than ever and they are taking advantage of that longevity to change the very face of retirement.

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Modern retirees can look forward to a post-work life that spans many decades, and that presents both challenges and opportunities. While past generations of retirees were happy to sit on their rocking chairs, play a few rounds of golf and just watch the world go by, new retirees are taking a different tack.

They are choosing to work part-time in retirement, or at least volunteer for causes they believe in. They are dedicated to staying active and socially engaged. They are looking for the support of their peers as well as interaction with people from all walks of life.

And given the fact that this generation of retirees lived through the social and cultural awakening of the 1960s, they are still looking for a way to make a difference. Not content to sit on the front porch and watch the sunset, today’s retirees are looking for alternatives in the way they live and the way they enjoy their retirement years.

That may be why so-called “green retirement communities” have been popping up all over the world. What started as a small-scale experiment just a few years ago is now a full-fledged movement. The emergence of green retirement living appears to be here to stay, and it is attracting active and socially conscious senior citizens from all walks of life.

As with so much in the world of retirement living, it is important for retirees to separate the hype from the reality when evaluating green retirement communities. The trend in green living and active social engagement is certainly an exciting one, but it is important for both current retirees and seniors thinking about retirement to review their options, examine their finances and choose the living arrangements that work best for them.

One of the most important things retirees and healthy living enthusiasts need to ask themselves is whether or not the green retirement community approach fits their lifestyle and expectations. Many green retirement communities have established communal gardens where residents can work together, share their expertise and grow their own food. While some active retirees may jump at the chance to dig in the dirt and get their hands dirty, others may prefer to spend their retirement years kicking back and relaxing.

The green retirement community lifestyle would be the perfect choice for the first retiree, but not so great for the latter. Lifestyle expectations are an important part of retirement planning, and evaluating those expectations is essential.

Retirees should keep in mind that unwinding a housing decision can be a difficult and expensive proposition. The choice of location is one of the most important decisions new retirees will ever make. Any retiree contemplating the green living alternative should carefully weigh the pros and cons before making an offer.

If you do decide that a green retirement community is the right choice for your post-work years, it is important to shop around and choose the one that best meets your needs and lifestyle expectations. Talk to the current residents. Find out what they like – and don’t like – about where they live. There are some great green retirement communities out there, but finding the best fit for your retirement is likely to take time and effort.

If you are a senior living provider that currently operates or is looking to start a new green retirement community, Silversphere can help you provide a completely customized Emergency Call System or Nurse Call System that meets the needs of your specific community. Visit www.silversphere.com/atmos to learn more about our ATMOSTM Emergency Call Systems today.

 

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